A. E. Köchert
Aarne
Aldo Cipullo
Art Deco
Baugrand
Berlin Iron
Birks & Sons
Black, Starr & Frost
Blackamoor jewellery
Boivin
Bolin
Boucheron
Buccellati
Bulgari
Carl Wagner and Frédéric-Jules Rudolphi
Cartier
Castellani
Chaumet
Cusi
David Webb
Fabergé
Falize
Fontana
Fouquet
Gaillard
Giuliano
Harry Winston
Henri Picq
J.E. Caldwell
Janesich
JAR
Jérémie Pauzié
John Rubel Co.
Koch
Kokoshnik
Kramer
Lacloche
Lalique
Louis-David Duval
Marchak
Marcus & Co.
Mastini
Mellerio dits Meller
Morozov
Natural pearls
Oscar Heyman & Bros
Paul Legrand
Ravasco
Schlumberger
Sterlé
Tiffany & Co.
Van Cleef & Arpels
Verdura
Wièse
William Ruser
Tiffany & Co.

In 1837, Charles Lewis Tiffany opened “Tiffany & Young” with his schoolmate John B. Young and adopted at that time the iconic blue colour for their jewel boxes. At Young’s retirement in 1853, the firm was renamed Tiffany & Co. In 1867, he became the first American jeweller to win an Award at the Paris Universal Exhibition. The firm gained fame thanks to Moore and Paulding Farnham’s – jewel designers – for their enamel and Japanese inspired Art Nouveau and Art Deco jewels. Its prestigious clientele counts the Prince of Wales, the Grand Duke Alexis of Russia, the Astors, the Morgans, Audrey Hepburn or Elizabeth Taylor.

Charles Lewis Tiffany died in 1902. His son, Louis Comfort Tiffany, a famous decorative artist, entered the firm as Artistic director and created innovative enamel jewellery. In 1956, Jean Schlumberger joined the house and gave a new impulse to the jewels’ artistic designs. Other designers such as Elsa Perreti, Paloma Picasso and Frank Gehry will also designed jewels for Tiffany & Co.

Tiffany’s flagship store, located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street since 1940, is famous thanks to the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany” starring Audrey Hepburn.
   
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