A. E. Köchert
Aarne
Aldo Cipullo
Art Deco
Baugrand
Berlin Iron
Birks & Sons
Black, Starr & Frost
Blackamoor jewellery
Boivin
Bolin
Boucheron
Buccellati
Bulgari
Carl Wagner and Frédéric-Jules Rudolphi
Cartier
Castellani
Chaumet
Cusi
David Webb
Fabergé
Falize
Fontana
Fouquet
Gaillard
Giuliano
Harry Winston
Henri Picq
J.E. Caldwell
Janesich
JAR
Jérémie Pauzié
John Rubel Co.
Koch
Kokoshnik
Kramer
Lacloche
Lalique
Louis-David Duval
Marchak
Marcus & Co.
Mastini
Mellerio dits Meller
Morozov
Natural pearls
Oscar Heyman & Bros
Paul Legrand
Ravasco
Schlumberger
Sterlé
Tiffany & Co.
Van Cleef & Arpels
Verdura
Wièse
William Ruser
Berlin Iron

The Royal Foundry of Berlin was created in 1804 and started to produce jewels two years later, when Napoleon invaded the city. In 1813, Princess Marianne asked the Prussian women to give their gold jewels and ornaments to the country to take part in the war effort. In exchange of this patriotic fervour, iron jewels were given to them, sometimes engraved with the mention "Gold gab ich für Eisen" (I gave gold for iron) or "Eingetauscht zum Wohle of Vaterlandes" (Exchanged for the welfare of the Fatherland). These jewels, said to be in "Fonte de Berlin" or “Berlin iron”, quickly became a symbol of this attachment to the Fatherland and were worn with pride.

Even after the war, the fashion continued and exceeded the borders to all Europe. Metal used, an iron and carbon alloy molten, was moulded, then enamelled of black and patinated to resist rust. Certain artists opened their own foundry, among most sought after were Schinkel, Geiss or Devaranne. The production continued in the years 1840 then gradually decreased towards the end of the 19th Century.
   
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